Detoxification & Rejuvenation


Specific organs

The role and function of some organs are mentioned below

Bladder

The urinary system regulates the volume and composition of fluids in the body and removes excess fluids. Excess fluids are filtered from the blood by the kidneys and excreted in the urine, which descends through the ureters into the bladder. Normally, urine is stored in the bladder until the muscles at the bladder outlet relax, allowing urine to be expelled through the urethra. Basically, the bladder controls the movement of urine. The muscles of the bladder are directed by the nervous system.

Female organs

The essential sex glands in women are the ovaries located on each side of the uterus. At puberty, they begin to release female germ cells, known as ova. Additionally, they synthesize the sex hormones (estrogen and progesterone) that affect the development of female sexu al characteristics and functions, such as general body shape, breast enlargement, menstrual cycles, as well as reproductive egg cells.

Gallbladder

The gallbladder is a small, pear-shaped pouch, located behind the liver. This organ is closely connected to the digestive system and is responsible for the physical and chemical breakdown of food. All the energy the body needs, and the basic nutrients for growth and repair of the organs and tissues, derived from ingested food, supplements, and drink. After ingestion, food and fluids are processed by the digestive organs, into small nutrient molecules that can be absorbed from the intestines into blood. Food that cannot be digested is turned into waste material. The gallbladder stores bile, the digestive liquid, produced by the liver. It then concentrates and releases that bile, which in turn reaches the duodenum. Bile assures the digestion of fat in the small intestin

Heart

The heart and blood (including the blood vessels) make up the circulatory system. The heart is an essential muscle (organ) for life. Blood is pumped by the heart through two circuits that carry the blood to and from the lungs and throughout the entire body. The blood provides nutrients to the body, removes waste products, and carries hemoglobin to bind with oxygen. It also houses some enzymes.

Kidneys

The kidneys perform the role of the main filtration system for the blood. They keep the body from storing excess levels of toxic waste, and they regulate essential minerals such as sodium, magnesium, chloride, and potassium. The kidneys are the most overworked system in the body. They suffer abuse from the lack of pure water and the consumption of carbonated beverages, caffeine, and alcohol. Under the influence of hormones, the kidneys regulate the volume, acidity, and salinity of the urine. When the kidneys lose their ability to remove excess acids consumed and produced in the body, they become clogged and/or unable to adequately remove urine. As a result, the body's pH, urine, and blood levels will be affected.

Large intestine

The large intestine is a part of the digestive system. The digestive system is responsible for the physical and chemical breakdown of food. All energy the body needs, and the basic nutrients for growth and repair of the organs and tissues, is derived from ingested food, supplements, and drink. After ingestion, food and fluids are processed by the digestive organs, into small nutrient molecules that can be absorbed from the intestines into the blood. Food that cannot be digested is turned into waste material. The role of the large intestine is to absorb water from food residue, stock partially digested food from the small intestine, and to form and store fecal matters.

Liver

The liver is the body's largest and one of the most important internal organs. It performs a wide range of functions similar to a chemical-processing factory. It processes absorbed nutrients, detoxifies harmful substances, and produces the digestive liquid called bile. The liver produces cholesterol and bile from the breakdown of dietary fat and old red blood cells. Using amino acids, it makes proteins and stores iron, glycogen, and vitamins. It also removes substances such as poisons and waste products from the blood, excreting or converting them into safer substances. Stress on the liver may result in diminished digestion capability and difficulty in removing toxins, leading to compromised health.

Lungs

The organs of respiration; the lungs supply oxygen to the bloodstream. The lungs are second only to the heart in their work rate, expanding and contracting between 12 and 20 times per minute. The lungs supply the body with the fresh oxygen it needs, and they expel carbon dioxide contained in the blood. Water and carbon dioxide are produced when cells break down nutrients such as glucose. Carbon dioxide travels in the blood to the lungs and is exhaled. The body cannot store Oxygen, and breathing moves air into and out of the lungs. The lungs are fragile and often stressed by environmental pollutants.

Male organs

The testes (a pair of rounded glands) are the essential male organs. The testes are the sperm- and hormone-producing male sex glands. Male sex hormones such as testosterone, in addition to assisting in the development of the genitalia and formation of sperm, also influence secondary sexual characteristics such as facial hair growth.

Pancreas

The pancreas is part of the digestive system. The digestive system is responsible for the physical and chemical breakdown of food. All energy the body needs, and the basic nutrients for growth and repair of the organs and tissues, is derived from ingested food, supplements, and drink. After ingestion, the digestive organs process food and fluids into small nutrient molecules that can be absorbed from the intestines. The pancreas regulates blood sugar levels and aids in overall digestion. It secretes digestive enzymes and a hormone necessary for sugar metabolism. This hormone reduces the emission of sugar in the liver. The pancreas also secretes another hormone, glucagon, which is an insulin antagonist.

Small intestine

The small intestine - the major site of digestion - is part of the digestive tract, which is responsible for the physical and chemical breakdown and absorption of food and nutrients. All energy the body needs, and the basic nutrients for growth and repair of the organs and tissues, is derived from ingested food, supplements, and drink. After ingestion, food and fluids are processed using a variety of digestive enzymes into small nutrient molecules that can be absorbed from the intestines into the blood. It normally takes 90 to 120 minutes for the first part of a meal you have eaten to move from the small intestine and reach the large intestine. The last portion of the meal may not reach the large intestine for five hours. Food that cannot be digested is turned into waste material.

Stomach

The stomach is a hollow, J-shaped muscular organ, located towards the left of the abdomen. It churns, digests, and stores food. The Stomach is the widest part of the gastrointestinal system, which is responsible for the physical and chemical breakdown of food. The stomach can expand to accommodate whatever food you eat. In the stomach, food is mixed thoroughly with hydrochloric acid and a variety of digestive enzymes secreted by the stomach lining - a process that begins as soon as food enters the stomach. Processed food is released gradually into the small intestine. Waves of muscular contractions move food through the stomach. Another function of the stomach is to act as a kind of sterilizing system, where the stomach acids kill germs in food.

Thyroid

The thyroid gland is a small endocrine gland at the base of the neck that secretes hormones into the bloodstream. Hormones integrate the activities of the widely separated organs. They reach every part of the body and the membrane of every cell as receptors for one or more hormones that stimulate or retard a specific body function. The thyroid's major hormone controls metabolism, growth, heart rate and the rate of energy expenditure. Another hormone aids in controlling Calcium metabolism, while yet another plays a very important role in the metabolism of Iodine. The thyroid also has a function in nourishing the skin.

Proper ph balance

Probably the most critical and most overlooked element to obtaining optimal nutritional health is understanding and maintaining a proper pH balance. The body is made up largely of water. Water can have an acid, alkaline, or neutral pH level. The term pH comes from the French phrase "pouvoir hydrogène" which means hydrogen power. pH is the measurement of the hydrogen ion concentration, expressed in logarithmic terms.

The optimal urinary balance is a pH reading of exactly 7.0. The pH of urine can range from an extremely unhealthy low of 4.5 to a high of 8.5. A pH measurement between 0 and 6.99 is considered acidic, while an alkaline pH measurement is one from 7.01 to 14. In healthy people, urine is most often slightly acidic (pH=6.5-7.0) in the morning, becoming more alkaline (pH=7.5-8.0) by evening. The pH level of urine will correspond to a balanced pH value of blood, meaning that when urine pH is normal, blood pH is normal. But when urine pH is overly acidic, blood pH can be dangerously acidic. Generally, when the urine pH level is 6.0 or lower for extended periods of time, it is an indication that the fluids elsewhere in the body are too acidic and the body is working overtime to rid itself of an acid medium. Even a minor deviation from the normal pH range can severely affect organ functionality.

When the pH level is outside the normal range (high or low), the body's cells are burdened with caustic pH fluids. The kidneys can handle normal imbalances or excesses quite easily and safely, but become stressed during times of extreme acidic or alkaline ranges. Compare this to acid rain in a forest or pollutants in a lake-long-term experience outside the normal range is dangerous. Extreme pH levels may begin to corrode the tissues of the cardiovascular system or other elements of the body. The imbalance of the body's pH is often referred to as a silent killer because it can cause toxic acid waste. An acidic pH forces a body's metabolism to work overtime to correct the imbalance and reducing its effectiveness in performing other essential functions. A balanced pH level (7.0-7.5) almost always means a more healthy body that is resistant to disease.

Causes of pH imbalance appear to point to today's typical diet. When food is broken down and metabolized by the body, "ash" (a chemical, metallic residue) remains, which when combined with other body fluids and components, creates the pH level. The consumption of acid-forming foods, such as meat, fish, poultry, eggs, sugar, bread, grains, cheese, pasta and nearly all fats are acid-forming and will often lead to a higher acid pH reading. Smoking cigarettes and the consumption alcohol are also acid-forming. Alkaline-forming foods include water, most fruits, vegetables, legumes, and some dairy products.

Extremely low pH (acidic) can be destructive, often contributing to many serious diseases (i.e., low energy levels, poor sleep patterns, degenerative diseases such as stroke, heart attack, diabetes, obesity, cancer, neurological dysfunction, and even premature death). If the urine pH level is less than 6.5, a person should focus on alkaline promoting foods and supplements, such as green foods and fruits, to elevate the overall pH. Nutritional supplements are also available to help bring the body back in balance.